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Spokane artists create floral skull display for Día de los Muertos

The skull was named Margarita, which means ‘Daisy’ in Spanish. Margarita is an embodiment of life and death, according to the Botanical Alchemists.
Credit: Botanical Alchemists

SPOKANE, Wash. — The Botanical Alchemists created their third annual Day of the Dead sugar skull design made with fresh flowers as an offering for Día de los Muertos on Tuesday.

The big floral skull was named Margarita, which means ‘Daisy’ in Spanish. Margarita has much to teach us as an embodiment of life and death, according to a Botanical Alchemists' Facebook post. Margarita's designed was inspired by the reverence and traditions of the Mexican culture.

The event was inspired by the reverence and traditions of the Mexican culture and was free for the community with the intention to make people come together as a community to mourn their loved ones, who have passed and celebrate their lives.

The event hosted on Tuesday had live music from local musicians, as well as a ceremony at sunset with candle lighting.

People also added flowers and photos, ashes, crystals, sage blends, and more to the community collective Heart Memorial.

People can stop by the Polly Judd Park and visit Margarita, while she’s freshest, or re-visit her as she slowly composts back into the Earth.

The Botanical Alchemists organizers Ava Barany and Sarah Lorraine wrote the following statement on their Facebook to thank people who helped with the skull and attended the event:

"Your collective energy infused the art with depth and soul. Thank you for pouring your tears and smiles and hellos and goodbyes into the night. Thank you for adding your flowers and photos, ashes, crystals, sage blends, and more to our community collective Heart Memorial. It was breathtaking to witness so much beauty spiral out in your loving footsteps through the Labyrinth," they wrote.

"We have much to learn from other cultures of the world, especially as it relates to death and loss. We draw great support from our Mexican friends in their traditional celebrations of Dia de los Muertos. Thank you for inspiring us to process death in deeper and more colorful ways," they wrote.