Victim’s wife: “there's a measure of comfort that justice will be served”

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by HAYLEY GUENTHNER & KREM.com

KREM.com

Posted on January 14, 2014 at 7:46 PM

Updated Tuesday, Feb 25 at 4:43 PM

SPOKANE, Wash.--Doug Carlile was shot in the kitchen of his South Hill home in December while his wife, Elberta Carlile, hid upstairs in their closet. Elberta Carlile spoke out for the first time Tuesday since her husband was killed.

Timothy Suckow, 50, is charged with first-degree murder of Carlile.

Doug and Elberta Carlile had been married for 42 years. They wed two weeks out of high school. They had six kids and 20 grandkids together.

Elberta Carlile said their dreams of watching their grandbabies grow up were torn apart on the December night when her husband was killed.
   
“We are just as in love today as we were when I first met him if not more because I know him and I know the wonderful person that he is,” said Elberta Carlile.

Elberta Carlile said they were soul mates, each other’s best friends and biggest cheerleaders.

“He called me ‘wife’ and I'd say ‘Doug you make me laugh everyday’ and he'd say ‘it's my job wife and I'm going to do that for the rest of my life, everyday’,” said Elberta Carlile.

Elberta Carlile said the day her husband was killed was just like any other day, filled with love. She said the couple was facing some stresses but that it did not matter because they had each other.

“We were sitting there and he was holding my hand and rubbing my thumb. We were just encouraging one another that everything was going to be okay,” said Elberta Carlile.

That same night Carlile was executed in his own home. Court documents showed Suckow shot Carlile after the couple arrived home from church.

DNA on a glove found at the scene and the recovery of a mask that Elberta Carlile said the killer wore are just a few of the things detectives stacked up against Suckow.

Elberta Carlile was in the courtroom Tuesday to see her husband’s accused murderer for the second time.

“It was horrible but there's a measure of comfort that justice will be served,” said Elberta Carlile.

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