Most Sherpas decide to leave Everest for the season

Print
Email
|

Associated Press

Posted on April 22, 2014 at 8:02 AM

Updated Tuesday, Apr 22 at 8:03 AM

KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) — The climbing season at Mount Everest is certain to be disrupted, now that most Sherpa mountain guides have decided to abandon their expeditions.

The decision came even after Nepal's government appeared to have agreed to some of the Sherpas' demands earlier today.

In the aftermath of an avalanche last week that left 13 Sherpas dead and three missing, the Sherpas made demands that included a relief fund for guides who are killed or injured in climbing accidents. The government agreed, but the funding falls well short of what the Sherpas wanted.

After a memorial service at base camp today, the Sherpas discussed their options. And one Sherpa who was there says most of them are planning to pack and leave as early as tomorrow. He says it's "impossible" for many of them to continue climbing, as three of their friends lie buried in the snow. He adds, "Out of respect for them, we just can't continue."

An official with a mountain guide association says he'll try to work out an agreement between the Sherpas and the government of Nepal -- since a total boycott would cause long-term damage to the nation's mountaineering.

%@AP Links

APPHOTO DEL109: Relatives of mountaineers, killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, cry during the funeral ceremony in Katmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 21, 2014. Buddhist monks cremated the remains of Sherpa guides who were buried in the deadliest avalanche ever recorded on Mount Everest, a disaster that has prompted calls for a climbing boycott by Nepal's ethnic Sherpa community. The avalanche killed at least 13 Sherpas. Three other Sherpas remain missing and are presumed dead. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha) (21 Apr 2014)

<<APPHOTO DEL109 (04/21/14)££

Print
Email
|