Oregon police chief recruitment video getting hot online

Oregon police chief recruitment video getting hot online

Oregon police chief recruitment video getting hot online

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by Evan Sernoffsky, kgw.com staff

KREM.com

Posted on August 11, 2013 at 6:51 AM

Updated Sunday, Aug 11 at 6:51 AM

HILLSBORO – A new video posted by the Hillsboro Police Department is getting a lot of attention online.

The video, which was made to recruit a new police chief, is a tongue-and-cheek portrayal of police work in Hillsboro. It features reenacted scenes with real cops and some actors, poking fun at the department and life in Hillsboro.

“They wanted to do something light-hearted to reflect the community,” said Brett Eichenberger, director of the video and owner of Resonance Productions. “We had done a project like this before, so we pitched them the idea.”

On Saturday, online gossip site GAWKER posted the video launching the small Portland suburb into the national digital spotlight.

Eichenberger’s company landed the gig to produce the video after a public bid. Resonance Productions was contacted to make the video through a local public relations firm that works with the city of Hillsboro.

On Thursday, the Oregonian reported the city of Hillsboro paid over $9,000 for the video that includes ownership of raw footage from the shoot, which took place in June.

The video has not been without its fair share of backlash online. One commenter on the Oregonian’s story writes: This is your idea of a professional recruitment tool ala Reno 911?”

Another commenter writes: Better keep it quiet that Hillsboro is in Washington County, the howdy doody law enforcement capital of the world…”

But Lt. Mike Rouches with the Hillsboro Police Department wasn’t fazed by those critical of the video.

“If you can’t deal with criticism online, how are you going to deal with real bad guys in the field,” he said. “I’m OK with that.”

Rouches points out that for the Hillsboro Police Department, police work is about more than just laws and regulations.

“It’s about people,” he said. “Every day our officers deal with people. We want the kind of chief who will understand our culture.”

Hillsboro’s last police chief, Carey Sullivan, was hired in June of 2010. He resigned in March following an ongoing labor dispute in the department.

While the department searches for a new chief, Rouches is optimistic about its future.

“We don’t hold ourselves to a higher esteem than anyone else,” he said. “Our culture of connectivity will stay intact.”

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