Sharlotte McGill Murder: Inside the crime lab

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by Chris Nguyen & KREM.com

KREM.com

Posted on May 10, 2012 at 5:15 PM

Updated Thursday, May 10 at 6:29 PM

The Sharlotte McGill homicide case is a top-priority for Washington state patrol, but because of the complexity of the analysis, it could take weeks before the crime lab is able to release a report on the evidence.

Inside the Washington State Patrol Crime Lab workers go through boxes and bags of DNA evidence.

The murder case of Sharlotte McGill is near the top of their list.

Lab analysts are working as fast as they can. They say they are looking for anything of, what they consider evidentiary value.

It typically takes anywhere from four to six weeks to process DNA evidence.

Kevin Fortney of WSP couldn't give specific details on the McGill case but, says he has at least two staff members combing through the pieces. "let's say there's a shirt, or a piece of clothing that comes in, the analyst would examine the shirt, and look for potential biological stains, be it blood, or saliva, or perspiration."

Using several different reagents or liquid type buffers, the DNA is pulled out and run through various instruments.

A computer interprets the data, resulting in a DNA profile. That information is submitted to a database, and then sent to police.

It’s very possible that more evidence from the McGill case could be brought in. Washington state patrol says me they're ready to take on the work load.

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