Suit filed to halt surveillance...Arias trial could be set for September...Pilot Flying J to repay truck companies

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Associated Press

Posted on July 16, 2013 at 3:00 PM

Updated Tuesday, Jul 16 at 3:00 PM

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Church leaders, gun-rights advocates and other activists have united in an effort to halt a National Security Agency electronic surveillance program. A lawsuit filed today by an unusually broad coalition of plaintiffs seeks an injunction against the NSA, Justice Department, FBI and the agencies' directors. The move comes after former NSA contractor Edward Snowden revealed a U.S. intelligence program that monitors Internet and telephone activity to ferret out terror plots.

MOSCOW (AP) — National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden has submitted a request for temporary asylum in Russia. His Russian lawyer says Snowden is claiming he faces persecution from the U.S. government and could face torture or death. He's been staying in the Moscow airport since he left Hong Kong on June 23.

PHOENIX (AP) — An Arizona judge says she expects a new sentencing trial for Jodi Arias will be scheduled for late September. But she's giving lawyers more time to file motions. The jury that convicted Arias of murder in the death of her boyfriend Travis Alexander couldn't agree on whether to sentence her to death. Her murder conviction stands, but prosecutors must now decide whether to try again for a death sentence with a new jury or to settle for life in prison.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Pilot Flying J truck-stop chain has agreed to pay back the trucking companies that were cheated out of fuel rebates. A federal judge in Arkansas has given preliminary approval to a class-action settlement that would pay the companies what they are owed with interest. Five employees have pleaded guilty to federal charges in the scheme. Pilot Flying J is owned by Jimmy Haslam (HAZ'-lam), who also owns the Cleveland Browns and is the brother of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of homeowners facing higher federal flood insurance premiums would win a temporary one-year reprieve under a measure that's beginning its advance through the Senate. The relief would go to homeowners in low-lying areas of Louisiana, Florida and other states where new government surveys could produce flood insurance premium increases so big that they might be no longer able to afford their homes.

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