Bolivia furious...Gearing up for more protests...Costly flood insurance

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Associated Press

Posted on July 3, 2013 at 3:00 AM

Updated Wednesday, Jul 3 at 3:00 AM

VIENNA (AP) — Bolivia says American Edward Snowden was not on its president's plane that was flying home from a summit in Russia. Bolivia's foreign minister is furious that several European countries refused to allow the plane into their airspace because they believed Snowden was on board. Snowden is wanted in the U.S. after disclosing secret U.S. government surveillance programs. Bolivia says when France and Portugal canceled authorization for the plane, they put Bolivian President Evo Morales' life at risk.

CAIRO (AP) — Supporters and opponents of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi are gearing up for a fourth consecutive day of mass rallies today, after overnight clashes left at least 23 people dead. Opponents are demanding that Morsi step down, but the country's first freely elected president says he's not going anywhere. Morsi was given a Wednesday deadline to either work things out with protesters or the military would step in, suspend the constitution, disband parliament and install a new leadership.

CLEVELAND (AP) — The Cleveland man accused of holding three women captive for years has a court hearing today. Last week a judge in Cuyahoga County ordered Ariel Castro evaluated to determine if he is mentally competent to stand trial. Lawyers for the 52-year-old man have raised the possibility of a plea deal if the death penalty is taken off the table.

MIAMI (AP) — Hurricane Dalila (dah-LY-lah) is drifting farther away from Mexico's Pacific coast and forecasters say the storm isn't expected to strengthen or weaken over the next 48 hours. Dalila was last tracked 325 miles west-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, and it's drifting farther west, away from the coast. Forecasters say the biggest danger is heavy surf and rip currents.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Protests from homeowners facing higher flood insurance premiums are inspiring their lawmakers to press for a delay in changing the federal program. The new system is designed so taxpayers won't have to keep subsidizing the program, but homeowners would no longer get below-cost rates. Louisiana homeowner Robert Taylor says that would mean his $400 a-year premium would skyrocket to $28,000 a year.

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