SEATTLE — One of the most impressive statistics for Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson is also one of the biggest indictments of the Seattle offense.

Through 10 games, he is the team’s top ground gainer with 376 yards. Wilson also leads the Seahawks in rushing attempts (58) and touchdowns (2). He's paced the team in rushing in three of the last four games, including Monday night, when he rushed for 86 yards and a touchdown in a 34-31 loss to Atlanta.

But what could the Seahawks offense look like with a consistent running game? Or even a consistent option at tailback?

“Russell is a great quarterback, so even if our running back was good, Russell is going to be Russell,” Seattle running back Mike Davis told USA TODAY Sports.

“Of course you don't want your quarterback to be your leading rusher, but I mean, if you watch us, you can't go off of stats. You go off how the guys play, and all our running backs run hard.”

The Seahawks haven’t had stability at the position since early in 2015, when Marshawn Lynch began missing time with a series of injuries. Since then, Seattle has cycled through Christine Michael, Thomas Rawls, C.J. Prosise, Chris Carson, Eddie Lacy, J.D. McKissic and, most recently, Davis, who was promoted off the practice squad last week and made his first start Monday. He showed burst and toughness and rushed for 41 yards on his first six carries only to suffer a groin injury that sidelined him in the second half.

“It was unfortunate that he got injured there. Mike Davis looked special,” Wilson said. “He was really running it, making people miss, and made great decisions.”

A legitimate ground game could also greatly benefit an injury-riddled Seattle defense by consuming the clock and keeping it off the field for long stretches.

While the Seahawks don’t believe Davis’ injury is serious, he is unlikely to play Sunday against the 49ers, meaning another lineup change is imminent. Rawls, who was inactive Monday to clear a spot on the game-day roster for Davis, could get the call. Or perhaps Lacy, who has just 130 yards on 51 carries in his first season in Seattle, gets the nod. McKissick has primarily been used as a third-down back but could always see his role expand.

“I don’t think it’s a lack of talent at running back,” Wilson said. “We have some great running backs, we just have to do a little bit better, that’s all.”

Just don’t be surprised if, for at least another week, it’s still Wilson doing most of the legwork.

Follow Lindsay H. Jones on Twitter @bylindsayhjones